Glimpse of Early Factory Life – Embroidered Patch History

Here at The Chicago Embroidery Company, we’ve been creating designs with needle and thread since 1890. A relative of one of our early workers recently discovered some old images from the turn of the last century and was kind enough to share the pictures with us. You can see all of the images on our website.

In the early days, each stitch was mapped out, the color, layout and type of stitch were taken into account. This is a manually operated pantograph machine. The operator moves material on a frame and traces the enlarged stiches while the needles are moving in and out.

This process is called “punching,” where the design is transformed from a paper drawing to a pattern that will run the loom machine. This is also where the science of embroidery meets the craft as various different punchers had subtle but unique signature styles of laying in the stitches.

Today, the entire process is run by computers controlling multi-head stitching machines.  Let us turn your design into an embroidered work of art. Send your idea/graphic to sales@c-emblem.com, visit our website for a free quote or call 312/664-4232.

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Embroidered Patches Are Fashion’s Next Trend

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This gallery contains 4 photos.

Here at The Chicago Embroidery Company, we make custom patches from your designs. This was a Huffington Post article written by Marcus Troy from about a year ago, showing patches are becoming a fashion accessory.  They still are hot; send … Continue reading

Embroidered Patches Increase Value of Shirt… Now Only $3,650

We’ve seen some crazy stuff here at The Chicago Embroidery Company in the 127 years the company has been in business, but this might be the wackiest.

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Apparently Selfridge’s is selling this shirt, featuring embroidered patches, for $3,650, though it should be noted that export duties are excluded.  The patches aren’t even all that intricate or detailed.ShirtCloseup

The Chicago Embroidery Company can make beautiful customized embroidered patches from your design, for considerably less $$$.  Send us your imagefor a free estimate, sales@c-emblem.com, or visit our website http://www.c-emblem.com, or give us a call, 312/664-4232.

Police Using Embroidered Patches To Fight Cancer

Today’s blog about innovative police officers using embroidered patches to fight cancer is from the Papillion Times:   La Vista (Nebraska) police officers won’t only be fighting against crime in October, they’ll be fighting cancer.

police cancer patch

LVPD will wear special pink patches on their uniforms in October in the continuing battle against cancer.

 

“Cancer affects many within the law enforcement community,” LVPD Chief Bob Lausten said. “We want to find a way to make a difference.”

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, but Lausten said the project is designed to attack all forms of cancer.

 

Lausten said the Pink Patch Project got its start in California several years ago and is starting to gain traction across the country. Lausten worked for several years in law enforcement in California.

 

“I keep in touch through the Los Angeles Chiefs Association so I’ve known about this project for a couple of years,” Lausten said. “It’s been working its way east so I decided this was the time I wanted to do it.”

 

Thanks to the La Vista Fraternal Order of Police, patches, uniforms and shirts will be made available to all officers and staff members in October.

 

“They were going to buy patches for all of us to wear in October and we would remove them at the end of the month,” Lausten said. “But then the FOP agreed to buy all new uniforms with the patches for the officers to wear, and polos for the civilian workers. The officers will even have their names embroidered in pink.

 

“With the union stepping forward and agreeing to pay for the patches and uniforms, it’s really been a win-win situation for us.”

 

Lausten said LVPD is also bumping up its No-Shave November campaign a month early to aid in the support.

 

“Officers will pay to a local charity to not have to shave for a month,” Lausten said. “We decided to move it up a month and have all the guys donate to the cancer charity.”

The charity LVPD is working with is Scare Away Cancer, an Omaha organization that sponsors a large event each year at Halloween with proceeds going toward cancer research.

Patches will be available for purchase by the public for $10 apiece with all the proceeds going to Scare Away Cancer. Patches can be purchased at the LVPD, 7701 S. 96th St., or online at scareawaycancer.org.

 

Lausten said La Vista is the first law enforcement agency in Nebraska to get on board with the project, but he’s hopeful others will follow.

 

Papillion Police Chief Scott Lyons said the department is planning on taking part in the project as well, but is still in the early planning stages.

“We’re the only one’s for now, but we hope this peaks so

me interest,” he said. “We’ve sent info out to the other departments.”

 

Lausten is encouraging those interested in purchasing a patch to do so quickly.

“There’s a limited supply and they’re already going pretty fast,” he said.

Create Typography Inspired By Embroidered Patches

THis is an aritcle written by Erica Larson for Adobe Create magazine: Though patches have been commonplace for decades, I’ve loved watching designers and illustrators take advantage of the medium’s recent surge in popularity. I’m particularly inspired by the work of Ben Goetting, who fuses his graphic design background with wonderfully irregular chain-stitch embroidery and a punk aesthetic. Listen to our interview with Goetting while you look at his work and follow a tutorial to make some of your own patch-ready type.

We don’t all have a vintage chain stitch machine, so I used Adobe Illustrator CC to compose typography around a graphic I created in Adobe Illustrator Draw, and then I gave the text the hand-drawn feel of the illustration.

patch jack 1

Step 1: In Illustrator, draw a circle with the ellipse tool. Choose the Type on a Path tool (underneath the Type tool), then click on your circle to add some placeholder text. Replace this with your own message, then center-align the text from the Control panel. If the text doesn’t land where you expect, don’t worry—we’re about to fix that.

Step 2: To position your message, press Esc to exit the text tool. Rotate the circle so the text is where you want it. You can also hold Shift while you rotate to snap the text to the top-center.

patch jack 2

Step 3: Now you can go wild with the typography. It’s helpful to apply your font first and then make the point size bigger. I used Brothers OT Bold from Typekit, adding letter spacing quickly by holding Option (Alt on Windows) and pressing the left and right arrow keys.

Patch jack 3

Step 4: If you’re really fancy and using a font with OpenType features, you can highlight individual letters to access alternate characters. Just click one of the alternates to swap it with the default. Then hug a type designer for the privilege of choosing from three different letter Q’s. (And discretionary ligatures! And swashes!)

Step 5: You can stop here, but I wanted to better unify the typography and the illustration. First I softened the corners of my text to match the round brush I used in the drawing. Zoom in on your type, and go to Effects > Stylize > Round Corners. Check the preview box, then experiment with the corner radius until you get something you like. I used a value of 0.03 inches, but settings will vary with the size of your art.

Step 6: For a handmade quality, go to Effects > Distort & Transform > Roughen. Check the preview box and the Smooth option, then play with the Size and Detail sliders until you get a subtle effect. When you zoom out again, you’ll see that the slight change does a lot to bring the text and image together.

Step 7: Almost done. If you want to send your artwork to a printer or manufacturer, right-click on the text and choose Create Outlines. This ensures they will see your design exactly as you intended it (and that you won’t get an angry email asking for a proper file). Outlining also means you can’t go back and edit the message, so save a live (un-outlined) version if you think you’ll change your mind.
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It doesn’t have to be complicated. Let the digital artists from The Chicago Embroidery Company help you design words (and pictures) that make your custom patch project sparkle.  Visit us at c-emblem.com , send your sketch to sales@c-emblem.com or call 312/664-4232.

On 100th birthday, Martha Mabe is on the job — sewing on embroidered patches

Working at London [OH] store each day is her ‘fountain of youth’

By Gary Brock – gbrock@civitasmedia.com
This month’s Patchplace is an article from the Troy Daily News in Troy, OH

 


Martha Jane Mabe works on a London High School jacket at the Mabe’s Clothing and Athletic Apparel store on South Main Street in London. (photos by Gary Brock | The Madison Press)

LONDON, Ohio — Martha Jane Mabe sat in front of her Consew sewing machine, carefully applying the school patch to the London High School jacket.

It was Wednesday afternoon, May 17 at Mabe’s Clothing and Athletic Apparel, the downtown London business that has been a part of her family for almost a hundred years.

It was a special day for Martha, and she said she was determined to be on the job that day of all days. Wednesday was her 100th birthday.

“I wanted to be able to work on my 100th birthday … if possible. It is very important to me. I wanted to make sure that no one made me do it, not my kids — nobody. I wanted to do what I want to do,” she said. “I did this all on my own.”

Carefully turning the London track and soccer varsity jacket on the sewing machine and applying the sports letters and patches, Martha talked with pride about her family’s business and her desire to work each day.

Born Martha Jane Moody in Madison County, she has lived here almost all her 100 years. “I was born on Xenia Road just outside of town and lived there practically my whole life.”

The business has been part of their family since 1919, just a couple of years after she was born. Her husband, Robert, was a partner in the company with founder Wilber Hume. Martha’s children are: David, Robert, Rebekah, and James, who has passed away; 10 grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandson.

On her 100th birthday, Martha didn’t hesitate to discuss her years of working at the family business. But all the while she continued to work on the London High School jacket. She said that sometimes threading the needle can be a challenge when she starts her work. “I sometimes have to ask Dave (her son and owner) for help,” she said. But on her birthday, her eyesight was sharp. “Well, I was lucky. I got it on the first try,” she said, and started work on the many patches that adorn the cloth and leather jacket.

All the time she talked, the sewing machine continued to whir and she moved the jacket around, taking care to get the patches and sport letters in the right locations. “You have to pull the lining and everything. It can be bulky.” She pointed out that she once sewed and embroidered a 5XL jacket. “That’s the largest jacket I have ever done.”

She says all the jackets she sews and embroiders are different. “It usually takes three to four hours for each one.”

She has been doing the sewing and embroidery work from about 1970. “I do this because I enjoy doing it. I used to do all the embroidery work by hand, on the hand machine. But not any more. I just don’t have the time.”

About a month ago, she took a fall and injured her back. She was off a few weeks, but said her time away from the daily routine of work took its toll on her. “I can see people staying at home and getting stagnant. But that wasn’t for me.”

She said she would never consider not working as long as her health allowed.

That’s no surprise to her son David, who runs the South Main Street business.

“She is very down to earth. She appreciates hard work and loyalty,” he said. “She tries to help people out as much as she can. She is very sharp. Physically she is in very good shape. She comes here to work about three hours a day.” He said she just gave up driving her car a few months ago. “It was her call. She just didn’t think she had the strength in her legs to apply the brakes. She had a pretty defined path or home to here (the store) and back.”

He said he is very proud of his mother. “Not everyone has a chance to work with their mother for 43 years. I see her about 300 days a year. She is just a wonderful person. She helped me with raising my kids. She was always there for all of us, helping in every way she can.”

He said it is her daily sewing and embroidery work at their store that has “kept her going the last 20 years or so. My father passed away when he was 69, and the work has kept her motivated.” He said working at the store has always been her call.

“It is her fountain of youth, her magic elixir. Instead of sitting at home, working has been good for her physically and mentally. She worked all of her life, there wasn’t much time for vacations.”

He said she is, “One of a kind. I’ve never known anyone like her and I don’t think there will ever be anyone like her,” he added.

When asked about the future, Martha paused and thought a moment.

She said she may stop coming in to work every day, “Probably this fall.” But she don’t want to call it a retirement.

“I just do as I feel. I come when I feel like it, every day,” she said.

When she is not doing the store’s sewing and embroidery work, what does she enjoying doing? “I used to love getting out and mowing. I do a lot of thinking while I’m mowing,” she said.

Her advise to those wanting to live a long life? “Always stay busy. That is what has been best for me. It is very easy to get stagnant and not do anything. If you enjoy what you are doing and you are helping someone, then do it. I can see people saying that when they retire, they just don’t do anything. But I don’t want to be that way. I want to be self-sufficient and do as much as I can and take care of things,” she said.

She said she never smoked, never drank any alcohol. She added that longevity ran in her family, with a number of siblings living into their 90s.

“I have worked all my life. I feel work never hurts anybody.”

She said the London community has been very good to them and their business. “I always to try to buy everything I can from London businesses,” she said during an informal birthday gathering Wednesday that included Mayor Pat Closser and members of the Downtown London Association, who brought a cake to celebrate her 100 years.

Son Robert Mabe echoed his mother’s feelings about the London community. “We owe this community a debt we can never repay.”

 

Martha Jane Mabe sits at her work station at Mabe’s Clothing and Athletic Apparel in downtown London Wednesday (May 10, 2017)on her 100th birthday. She said she wanted to work on her birthday, a job she says she’s been doing almost every day since about 1970.

 

Embroidered Patches Show Artistic Talent of U.S. Drug Cops

 

green airHere at The Chicago Embroidery Company, we’ve made a variety of law enforcement patches over the years, but this piece from Christopher Ingraham, originally published on Washington Post’s Wonkblog, shows how the DEA and other agencies have used embroidered emblem artistry to showcase their varied missions.

On one patch, from the DEA’s Cocaine Intelligence Unit, cocthe Grim Reaper sits on a bomb and does cocaine. On a patch made for the DEA’s International Conference on Ecstasy and Club Drugs, he goes to a rave holding glow-sticks and a pacifier. Other patches feature dragons, unicorns, camels and bald eagles swooping down on marijuana plants, talons outstretched.

Federal agencies began adopting patches in the 1970s, according to Raymond Sherrard, a retired special agent with the IRS’s Criminal Investigation division. Sherrard is the author of “The eradEncyclopedia of Federal Law Enforcement Patches,” generally considered to be the bible of the federal patch collecting community. It contains thousands of color photos of federal agency patches and was compiled by Sherrard with the assistance of hundreds of collectors, law enforcement officers and organizations.

In the 1970s, Sherrard says, different federal law enforcement agencies began to team up to tackle big cases. In his own IRS division, which investigated drug traffickers and money launderers, “we had probably dozens of people from different agencies, most of whom had never seen each other before,” he told me. When raiding suspected drug operations, the agents needed a quick visual way to identify one another. “In the ’70s, everyone looked like drug dealers,” he said, commenting on the style of an era distinguished by long hair, mustaches and flamboyant fashions.ecstasy

So the offices started making custom “raid jackets” with the seals of the respective agencies on them. “As time went on, there were more and more task forces created,” Sherrard said. “Pretty soon every federal agency had all these patches.”

The patches soon began to evolve beyond their original purpose. These patches are often not produced in an official capacity, or with the knowledge or approval of an agency’s higher-ups. In his book, Sherrard writes that there are hundreds, maybe thousands, of “commemorative, anniversary, special unit, ‘giveaway’ and local team patches, many of which are unknown or unapproved by headquarters.”tech

Many of the DEA patches likely fall into this category. A DEA spokesman, who declined to be quoted by name in discussing the issue in an interview, said the patches are typically designed and paid for by the agents themselves. “They reflect an esprit de corps, used as a memento, or a token of gratitude to other officers” who help with major missions, he said. The agency itself only commissions and pays for official DEA seals and badges.

DEA IntellSome patches celebrate the completion of a major initiative, such as the patch for Operation Green Air, a partnership between the DEA and FedEx to bust a major marijuana smuggling operation in 2000. Others are given to cooperating local agencies as tokens of appreciation. “Most are never worn,” Sherrard writes, “but are used in displays or sewn onto a baseball cap, or simply kept in binders. Some are very collectible.”

Fred Repp Jr. is an active duty officer with the Bureau of Prisons in New Jersey. He runs Fred’s Patch Corner, a site for buying, selling and trading patches online. He’s particularly interested in the narcotics patches, especially ones that come from task forces overseas.Kabul

“DEA agents are in Afghanistan right now, working with local police to destroy poppy fields,” he told me. “Those patches are being produced in such low numbers by the teams, you might have 12 guys,” which means 12 patches, maybe a couple of spares. On such overseas assignments, Repp said, patches are usually manufactured on-site by locals. Patches produced in such small quantities are hard to come by.

“The whole thing about collecting is the seeking out,” Repp said. “A lot of guys have a story about how they came across something for their collection.”

There are as many different types of patch collectors as there are patches. Some, like Repp, are interested in patches from a particular agency or task force. Others only collect patches shaped like states, or that contain representations of birds.heat

There’s a brisk trade in DEA patches on eBay, and on the sites of individual collectors like Repp. Sherrard, the author, estimates that there are about 20,000 different federal law enforcement patch designs, some more sought-after than others. He’s known some of these to sell for hundreds or even thousands of dollars, although most sell for $5 to $10.

Sherrard says patches from FBI hostage rescue teams are among the most sought-after, because only a few are ever made. Patches from the CIA and NSA are also difficult to come by, because teams in these agencies are highly protective of them and don’t typically give them to people outside the organization.

“Most of the collectors are cops,” Sherrard said. “They’re either active or retired.” But some people collect the patches for other reasons.

“A reflection of the mentality of law enforcement”

Larry Kirk, a police chief in Old Monroe, Mo., has closely followed the patch trend. He was initially interested in the special unit patches. “I was interested in the culture behind them — it’s kind of a neat story,” he said. But in the past 10 years or so, he’s noticed a change in the iconography used on many law enforcement patches, even at the local level.forfeit

Many have “become reminiscent of military unit patches,” he said. “A lot of them are very aggressive, some of them have skulls, rattlesnakes, vipers. … It’s another sign of that warrior soldier mindset now that’s throughout law enforcement.” As law enforcement agencies have increasingly adopted military weapons and tactics, the patches suggest that they seem to be embracing military iconography as well.

Asked about this pattern, the DEA spokesman said that on some patches, “you’ll see the specter of death because drug abuse is dangerous. It reflects the dangers of drug abuse and the violence associated with drug trafficking.”

Other patches celebrate controversial practices and programs. The DEA’s asset forfeiture program, for instance, has allowed law enforcement agencies to seize millions of dollars in cash and property from citizens without charging them with crimes. The practice has come under criticism from lawmakers in both parties and was recently sharply curtailed by the Justice Department. The program’s patch contains the slogan, “You make it, we’ll take it.”dal

Surveillance themes also show up in a lot of narcotics patches. In the DEA Technical Operations patch, above, a scorpion with a radio dish for a tail listens in on signals from a nearby cellphone tower under an arc of lightning bolts. This type of imagery may not play well with members of the public who are concerned about the federal government monitoring their communications.

Some law enforcement agencies are “painting the picture that this is some type of war, on crime, or gangs, or drugs,” Kirk said. “It’s a reflection of these units taking on paramilitary ideas. It’s definitely a change in the culture that started taking place in the mid-’90s until now.”imrs

“Reminders of the absurdity we are up against”

For some, the patches have come to represent the excesses of the drug war. Aaron Malin is the director of research for Show-Me Cannabis, an organization working to legalize, tax and regulate marijuana in Missouri and a critic of Missouri’s drug task forces.  “When I first saw some of these patches, I didn’t think they could be real,” he said in an interview. “But after spending the last year and a half investigating the horrific ways in which the drug war is carried out, they don’t seem inconsistent with the mindsets of the officers who wear them.” (For many years, Missouri led the nation in methamphetamine busts as numerous state’s drug tasks forces sought to address abuse of the drug.)

One patch for a DEA Maryland Metro Area Task Force depicts a bloody skull impaled on a sword against a background of the Maryland flag. The skull holds a set of scales between its teeth.

A patch from DEA’s “First Virginia Cavalry,”  which operated out of Roanoke, Va. vrgin the late ’80s and early ’90s, shows a skull wearing a cowboy hat featuring crossed hypodermic needles against a Confederate flag background.

Sherrard notes that nowadays the DEA “is a much more politically correct agency than in the past” and that the patches are used less frequently. But Malin says the extreme imagery “represents a manifestation of the most absurd levels of the drug war. I more or less collect them as reminders of the absurdity we are up against.”

Not for public consumption

The other important point to consider is that many patches are essentially private documents, made by law enforcement officers for law enforcement officers. “They’re made as collectibles,” Sherrard says. They’re for internal morale-boosting and team-building. Officers from different agencies trade them with one another, “like a business card in some ways,” Sherrard says.strik

When we talk about large federal agencies like the DEA, it’s easy to forget that every monolithic bureaucracy is composed, essentially, of individuals.

It’s one thing to dismiss the asset forfeiture program as terrible policy, for instance. But it’s another to remember that the individual agents who carry out that policy are, in many ways, just regular people doing a job they’ve been assigned. Field agents don’t write policy — Congress does. Why wouldn’t we expect the people who carry out that policy to take pride in their work, and to wear that pride on their sleeve?
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You don’t have to be a drug cop to get a cool embroidered patch, we’ll work with you to create a distinctive emblem for your group, team, business, club (or police department). Check us out at www.c-emblem.com , e-mail to sales@c-emblem.com or call us 312/664-4232. For more than 127 years, The Chicago Embroidery Company has been creating this beautiful, vibrant art with only fabric, a needle and thread.